Basic Plays

Basic Plays

  • PSA: This stands for pass & screen away. There is a player at the top with the ball, and players at both wings, all extended beyond the 3-point arc. The top player passes the ball to a wing player, then goes to set a screen for the other wing player. You can practice this continuously, where each player rotates through all 3 starting points. It is recommended for the player about to get a screen set for him, to v-cut or take steps away to set it up properly. After x amount of reps, for example after the 10th pass, have the player with the ball drive for a layup or shoot a shot.
  • Weave: The weave can be done as a second step after PSA. The top player dribbles towards a wing player. At the same time, the wing player meets halfway and receives the handoff. The handoff can be flipped up to the chest or bounce passed. It is recommended for the player about to receive the handoff to v-cut or take steps away to create space for the pass. After x amount of reps, for example after the 10th pass, have the player with the ball drive for a layup or shoot a shot.
  • Pick & Roll: 1 offensive player sets a pick for the ball-handler. Meanwhile, the ball-handler should set up the pick by dribbling or jab stepping in the other direction. The player setting the pick can roll to the basket for a possible layup or rebound. Another option is to pick & pop, where the player sets a pick and then pops out to an open perimeter area (mid-range or 3P). The ball-handler should use the pick as close to his teammate as possible to shed the defender. Then, the 2 on 2 play can possibly turn into a 2 on 1 with only the screener’s defender in the play. The terminology between screen and pick can be used interchangeably. If there are any teammates they should keep proper floor spacing and react accordingly.
    • For example: If a pick & roll takes place at the top, a perimeter teammate away from the play should be in the corner and a post player should be on the opposite side that the pick takes place.
    • Another example: If the screen takes place at one wing, a perimeter teammate should spot up at the opposite wing/corner while the post player fluctuates between the opposite low/high post areas.
  • Motion: Any motion play is based on quick decisions with the ball, and constant movement without the ball. As far as specific directions go, there are countless motion plays that can be drawn up or looked up.
    • An example to practice with multiple players: Begin with a player at top, one at each wing, and one at each block. The top player has the ball to initiate the offense and can do so by running PSA. Not only can the passer begin running PSA, other players without the ball can set a screen or use a screen to keep floor spacing and the defense moving. Off-ball options include v-cuts, slashing backdoor, and flashing to the high post. Options with the ball include possible 1 on 1 opportunities, skip passes, pick & rolls, and running the weave.
      • There are different types of screens away from the ball that can be set as well: back screen (post goes up to wing and sets screen), down screen (wing player goes down to block and sets screen), double screen (2 players set a screen side-by-side for 1 player), and a stagger screen (2 players set a screen a few feet a part from each other for 1 player).